DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-2902.isj20214752

Clinical evaluation and management of scrotal swelling

Upendra Pawar, Sharanbasappa Gubbi

Abstract


Background: The present study was conducted with the main purpose to identify the mode of presentation, various treatment modalities and outcome of these with their complications.

Methods: This prospective study was carried out on a total of 100 subjects presented with scrotal swellings. Exhibiting symptoms were noted including discomfort, painless swelling, urine symptoms and fever. Questionnaires were used to analyse all the predisposing factors of patients, which were then categorized as idiopathic, urinary problems, trauma or previous history. Ultrasound as well as colour Doppler was carried out on all subjects. The options for treatment were either surgical or conservative. The cases treated were recorded accordingly and follow up was done.

Results: The majority of study patients, that is, 56%, suffered with scrotal swelling on the right side, followed by left (40%) and bilateral side (4%). 63% of the subjects were presented with symptoms of painless swelling. Whereas 27% of the study subjects were presented with symptoms of pain and fever and 10% of them showed only the symptoms of pain. The majority of study subjects, that is, 71% were treated with surgical modality. Whereas 29% with conservation modality. The most common USG finding found among the study subjects was hydrocoele (37%). 37 (37.0%) subjects having hydrocoele suffered postoperative complications.

Conclusions: Younger age group and manual labourers were more prone to scrotal swellings. Few of the operated cases developed postoperative complications like epididymoorchitis. There is a resurgence of thorough clinical examination to establish a diagnosis in patients with scrotal swelling.

 


Keywords


Scrotal swelling, Symptoms, Treatment modality, Hydrocele, Epididymoorchitis

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