DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2349-2902.isj20204713

Robotic surgery in Nigeria: an uncertain possibility

Tunde A. Oyebamiji

Abstract


Since its introduction about 2 decades ago, surgical robots are becoming increasingly used in many surgical operations. The emerging technology has increased the efficiency, reliability and precision of surgical procedures. It has minimized overall post-operative complications and led to faster patient recovery. Although there are some limitations to robotic surgery, its many advantages have generated great excitement within the surgical community. Thus, there is an exponential growth in the use of the surgical robot across numerous surgical specialties and in many developed nations of the world. In Africa, the robotic surgical system has only been adopted in South Africa and Egypt for limited surgical cases. However, there has been no documented use in Nigeria. The implementation of robotic surgery in Nigeria is been hampered by low budget allocation to health, a regressive health care financing model, epileptic power supply and most of all, poor leadership make the implementation of robotic surgery in Nigeria challenging. The cost of acquiring and maintaining the surgical robot will gradually become cheaper as more robotic surgical manufacturers enter the marketplace, thereby making it more affordable and accessible in low- and middle-income countries. Effective leadership and critical investment in health care systems and human capital, will increase the possibility of implementing a robotic surgical program in the future.


Keywords


Robotic surgery, Faster patient recovery, Regressive health care financing model, Poor leadership, Healthcare systems, Nigeria

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